Summary of story of an hour

Characters[ edit ] Louise Mallard is a young married woman, who feels constrained in her home and her marriage. This production is mostly concerned with the psychological state. She realizes after her husband's apparent death that she is "free, free, free".

Mallard questions the meaning of love and ultimately rejects it as meaningless. She feels ecstatic with her newfound sense of independence.

The Story of an Hour

After being released of her husband's grasp, she began to find relations to the world. Mallard gazes for a majority of the story is a sign of the freedom and opportunities that await her through her newfound independence.

In her room, Mrs.

The Story of an Hour Summary

She looks out the window and looks out at a world that seems alive and fresh. The front door unexpectedly opens, and Brently comes in. Mallard's life has been devoid of emotion to such an extent that she has even wondered if it is worth living. Active Themes After her initial sobs of grief subside, Louise escapes into her bedroom and locks the door.

It's shown that women who are married feel trapped and they are less happier then married men. She says a short prayer that her life will be long, and knows that it was just the day before when she wished it would be short.

The railroad, he claims, may be the cause of the distance between the Mallards and many other couples of the time. His hands were tender, and he always looked at her lovingly. As mentioned in the article Emotions in the Story of an Hour, the reader could assume that Mrs.

Body and soul free. And although she fights it—trying hard to resist—she senses a feeling approaching her. Berkove notes that there has been "virtual critical agreement" that the story is about female liberation from a repressive marriage. Slowly, she begins to grasp the feeling that so overtakes her, and she redoubles her efforts to keep it away.

The delicious breath of rain was in the air. All of a sudden, as she is gazing outside this window, a feeling comes to her. Still crying, she gazes into the distance. September Learn how and when to remove this template message "The Story of an Hour" expresses every emotion that Louise Mallard feels after she finds out about the death of her husband.

She is unable to articulate the nature of the sensation, which makes her fear it all the more. After the death of her husband, Mrs. Mallard, which happened on a train, came through.

She thinks that all women and men oppress one another even if they do it out of kindness. Mallard as an "immature egotist" and a "victim of her own extreme self-assertion".

Mallard breathes heavily and tries to resist before succumbing to this unknown thing, which is a feeling of freedom.

Berkove notes that there has been "virtual critical agreement" that the story is about female liberation from a repressive marriage. Mallard was unable to shake the thought of being free from her husband. When she sees that her husband is still alive, she lets out a startled cry and dies from a heart attack.

Mallard is indirectly shown to feel trapped within her marriage. "The Story of An Hour" Kate Chopin () Knowing that Mrs. Mallard was afflicted with a heart trouble, great care was taken to break to her as gently as possible the news of her husband's death.

In the first paragraph of "The Story of an Hour," Chopin uses the term "heart trouble" primarily in a medical sense, but over the course of the story, Mrs.

Mallard's presumed frailty seems to be largely a result of psychological repression rather than truly physiological factors.

Story of an Hour Summary SuperSummary, a modern alternative to SparkNotes and CliffsNotes, offers high-quality study guides for challenging works of literature.

Keep reading for an expert-written summary and analysis of Story of an Hour by Kate Chopin. She did not hear the story as many women have heard the same, with a paralyzed inability to accept its significance.

She wept at once, with sudden, wild abandonment, in her sister's arms. LitCharts assigns a color and icon to each theme in The Story of an Hour, which you can use to track the themes throughout the work. In the first paragraph of "The Story of an Hour," Chopin uses the term "heart trouble" primarily in a medical sense, but over the course of the story, Mrs.

Mallard's presumed frailty seems to be largely a result of psychological repression rather than truly physiological factors.

Summary of story of an hour
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